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President Obama and Mitt Romney – Where Do They Differ on Education Policy?

On July 31, 2012, in Education, General, In The News, Teaching, by Scott Cronenweth
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So where do the two candidates differ on education? One area is on federal involvement in education. In step with the massive cuts their budget votes made to school funding over the next two years, Republicans – including Romney – want to dismantle the US Department of Education.

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The “Shadow Side” of Asia’s Tutoring Boom

On July 10, 2012, in In The News, Tutoring, by Scott Cronenweth
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A study just released by the Asian Development Bank (ADB), a development institution devoted to reducing poverty in Asia, calls into question many aspects of this burgeoning trend – especially whether all this tutoring is beneficial for students and cost-effective for their families. The report also raises concerns about the social inequalities that access to tutoring could be perpetuating.

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Does Teacher Performance Pay Improve Student Achievement?

On May 22, 2012, in Education, In The News, Pay for Performance, Teaching, by Scott Cronenweth
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A recent study by the international Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) found no clear link between performance pay for teachers and higher student achievement in schools.

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The STEM Trend’s Growing Impact on Out-of-School Learning

On January 10, 2012, in Education Industry, Technology, Technology in Education, Tutoring, by Scott Cronenweth
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The growing energy behind STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) curricula in US schools is influencing the after-school and tutoring communities to provide new learning options.

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High-Stakes Standardized Testing in China

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In the US, mandatory standardized testing on the national level has primarily been put forth as a public policy strategy, with the aim of establishing stronger accountability measures for public education. … But what has not been a credible part of the standardized testing debate in the US is the idea of making such a test a high-stakes, make-or-break determinant of students’ professional aptitude, college admissions, etc. … In stark contrast is the situation in China…

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Will Waiver Program Effectively End SES?

On November 22, 2011, in Education, Education Industry, In The News, Tutoring, Uncategorized, by Scott Cronenweth
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Already thirty-seven states plus the District of Columbia have said that they intend to apply for an SES waiver between now and mid-February 2012. If granted, the waivers would free districts in these states from setting aside hundreds of millions of dollars each year for after-school tutoring targeting the lowest-performing students. This sweeping change would effectively end SES, which has already been eliminated from the Senate’s version of the updated NCLB legislation.

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The Value of World Teacher’s Day

On October 18, 2011, in General, In The News, by Scott Cronenweth
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Why is World Teacher’s Day important? As education becomes increasingly important to economic advancement and success in both developed and developing countries around the world, the importance of teachers in all our lives is growing.

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How Well Do Kids Think High School Prepared Them for College?

On September 6, 2011, in Education Industry, General, In The News, Uncategorized, by Scott Cronenweth
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How well does their high school academic experience prepare students for college? Not very well, according to a new study by the College Board that surveyed students from the Class of 2010 “one year out.”

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The Debate Around Federally Funded Free Tutoring Heats Up

On July 19, 2011, in Education Industry, In The News, Tutoring, Uncategorized, by Scott Cronenweth
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Congress is debating whether to keep various components of No Child Left Behind — including Supplemental Education Services (SES), which provides federally funded free tutoring. How well is this program performing? And is it likely to survive the budget cuts?

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Early High School Graduation – Issues and Impacts for Tutors

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As US school districts struggle with shrinking budgets, the option to snip a year or even two from students’ high school education has become increasingly appealing. These programs, modeled on systems that have been successful in Singapore, France, Finland and other high-performing countries, hopes to shift the emphasis from seat time and credits to verifiable subject mastery. What might the impact of these programs be on tutoring?